UN Resolution 1325

UN Resolution 1325

UN Resolution 1325

On October 31, 2000 the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1325 on “Women, Peace and Security.” This resolution provides that women be adequately represented on all levels in peacebuilding processes and in the making of security policies. UN member states are urged to take into account the different living conditions of women and men in wartime and postwar situations, in civilian crisis prevention, and in state reconstruction. Women and girls must be protected from sexual violence. The contents of the resolution can thus be summed up by three “Ps”: participation, prevention, and protection.

Resolution 1325 is considered a historic breakthrough for the international women’s peace movement. Its weakness, however, is that no quotas or time limits have been established, no funding targets set, and the results of the process are not being monitored.

The German government has so far submitted two reports on the implementation of Resolution 1325, the first in 2004, the second in 2007. The German Women’s Security Council, a network of German women peace researchers and peace activists, has been critical of both reports and has published its own “shadow reports”.

Sources:

Further information:

Book: Roadmap to 1325

Resolution for Gender-Sensitive Peace and Security Policies

Edited by the Gunda Werner Institute for Feminism and Gender Democracy in the Heinrich Böll Foundation
Verlag Barbara Budrich, Leverkusen/Farmington Hills 2010, 224 pages, 22,00 Euros
ISBN 978-3-86649-311-7

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