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For Whom The Bells Toll: Not for Feminists, or Civil Society!

Whose voices are represented in speeches and conferences about women's economic empowerment? As Priti Darooka reports on her experience at this year's W20 Summit in Berlin, there seems to be a disconnect between renowned business conference spaces and grassroots feminist discourses.

By Priti Darooka

Women’s Rights all over the World: A Report from CSW61

The world needs more women leaders and men standing up for gender equality, UN Chief Antonio Guterras re-iterated at the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) that held its 61st annual session in New York from 13-24 March, 2017.

By Shalini Yog Shah, Dr. Axel Harneit-Sievers

"One Cube" Three, yet one!

"One Cube" Three, yet one! - is a documentary film by Pramod Dev. Depicting three women who work in export-oriented sectors of India's economy.

By Shalini Yog Shah

The Invisible Hands - India

What is the impact on the country's economy and society when its women double up as unpaid and underpaid labourers? Are these women subsidising the economy? If yes, how much is it? This short documentary raises such questions and provides apparent answers so that you will raise even more questions. Presenting "The Invisible Hands… that build India"- a curtain raiser on Gender and Macroeconomics. 

By Pramod Dev

Gender Equality in the Post-2015 Development Agenda: Where Does it Stand?

The Rio + 20 Conference ‘The Future We Want’ took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in June 2012. Women’s groups were critical of the Conference because it failed to make a stronger link between women’s rights and the environment, and to bring more women experts and activists into the official dialogue and meeting structure.

By Alexandra Spieldoch

Missing Women: The G20, Gender Equality and Global Economic Governance

The policy priorities of the G20 have profound gender implications, although the G20 rarely recognizes this fact. This report explores the possibilities for gender bias in the G20's policies, including those related to: fiscal and monetary priorities, employment, social protection, and development. 

By James Heintz - University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Rio + 20 Gender Equity and Sustainable Development

On the eve of Rio+20, the Heinrich Böll Stiftung North America has asked several of its partners from civil society to reflect in short commentaries about some of the linkages and synergies between gender equity and key issue areas of sustainable development.

The Feminist Movement and Rio+20

For the Women’s Movement, this debate is essential as women are on the frontlines of the withdrawal and weakening of already established human rights. When one reviews the main environmental problems, one sees a differentiated impact on women and the poor because of the vulnerable contexts in which they live.  The various forms of contamination and poisoning of water and food they face in their environment affect the daily responsibilities of women and the care of their families. 

By Graciela Rodriguez

Mobilizing Women’s “Power of the Purse” to Help Achieve Sustainable Consumption

Women control or influence 65 percent of global consumer spending, which amounts to $20 trillion annually. In most countries, women are in charge of household purchasing, which accounts for more than 60 percent of all consumption impacts, once the entire life cycle of manufacturing products and providing services is taken into account. With this in mind, strategies are needed to encourage women to direct their spending to support sustainable development. 

By Diane MacEachern

Informalisation of Women's Work in India

Can we speak of a ‘feminization of labour’ in the Indian context? Questions on Informal labour, the casualization of work and possibilities for a gender targeted social security in an Interview with Dr. Govind Kelkar.

European policies in the wake of the globalisation of care work

Women’s increasing integration into the labour market comes with a crisis of care systems and the development of a labour market for care work. Increasingly women migrate to richer countries to seek employment in the care sector, hoping their salary will improve the living conditions of their families. 

By Maria Kontos

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