Africa

Kenya grapples with fake news as women, politicians take the hit

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Women politicians and journalists have fallen victim of false information, most often through personal attacks meant to discourage them from politics or silence their voices in the media. Studies by AMWIK, ‘Women Journalists’ Digital Security’ in 2016 and 2017 indicate that social media has been the most used platform for attacks against female journalists, with the most common gendered attacks being cyber stalking, sexual harassment, impersonation with parody accounts, surveillance and un-authorized use and manipulation of personal information, including images, and videos. With more women in the public limelight, it is projected that more will become victims of fake news.

Decriminalizing homosexuality in Kenya

On the 24th of May 2019, Kenya's High Court will decide whether the sections of the Kenyan penal code that proscribe homosexual activity are unconstitutional. The Kenyan National Gay and Lesbian Commission (NGLHRC) has for years been fighting to repeal these laws.

By Caroline Kioko

Kenya’s LGBTQ #Repeal162 case ruling postponed

Article

Article 27.4 of the Kenyan constitution states "The state shall not discriminate directly or indirectly against any person on any ground, including race, sex, pregnancy, marital status, health status, ethnic or social origin, colour, age, disability, religion, conscience, belief, culture, dress, language or birth." However, the state and the citizens of Kenya have engaged in the systematic discrimination, stigma and violence against LGBTIQ persons in Kenya.

In Defence of Individual Liberties: Bodily Liberties in a Civil Democratic State

All citizens, male and female, have equal rights and duties and are equal before the law without any discrimination. The state guarantees freedoms and individual and collective rights to all citizens, and provides all citizens the conditions for a dignified life.  (Article 21 of the Tunisian Constitution adopted on  January 27, 2014)[i]

 

[i] Translation of this and other texts from the Tunisian constitution and Penal Code by Ms. Wafa Ben Haj Omar.

By Wafa Ben Haj Omar, Professor Wahid Ferchichi

Intergenerational Dialogue on Feminist Activism

We hosted a conversation with three women, Julia Ojiambo, Daisy Amdany and Njoki Ngumi, representing different generations of activists. The coffee table dialogue seeks to find out the extent to which global plans and strategies have informed activists at different moments and how feminist action develops across generations.

Why Don’t Women Vote For Other Women? Reconsidering Automatic Privilege and Tokenism in Political Processes

As Zanzibar gearsup for a rerun of Presidential, Legislative and Local Councils Elections annulled in October 2015, the Regional Commissioner (RC) of Mwanza, Magessa Mulongo on March 8th while commemorating International Women’s Day made some remarks worthy of a response. Mr. Mulongo used a familiar trope to try to explain women’s low numbers in representative structures-elected or nominated: he chastised women for being each other’s worst enemy.

By Salma Maoulidi

Integrating Men into Gender Equality: Six Illustrations

Th Heinrich-Boell-Foundation in Nairobi has created six illustrations that highlight and discuss some of the ongoing challenges around the imporant tasks of targeting and reaching men as advocates for gender equality in Kenya.

By Anzetse Were , Nduhiu Change

Video: Beijing+20 in South Africa

The Heinrich Böll Stiftung Southern Africa office spoke to five leading women’s rights activists on their perceptions of the challenges that women in South Africa face today and whether the Beijing Declaration, and South Africa’s commitment to it, remains relevant to addressing those challenges.

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