The Implementation of Resolution 1325 in Israel

The Knesset in Jerusalem. The implementation of the UN resolution, is difficult because the main political actors are former generals and almost without exception, the most important decision-making bodies in Israel are exclusively male occupied.

The Implementation of Resolution 1325 in IsraelPDF

 


Israel was the first UN member to integrate resolution 1325 and turn it into the law of the land. But unfortunately, since that happy moment of success, the official Israel refuses to abide by its own law.
This milestone points to dilemmas that we – women organizations, feminists and peace activists – face when we try to make ourselves heard and have an impact on the political process.

Criterial Dilemma

The first dilemma is criterial. It emanates from the fact that women form groups of different types. Common to all is the desire to promote women and their agenda; yet it is but natural, that women’s organizations are of varied political colors.

Political Dilemma

The second dilemma is political: who are the women that can bring to the table the feminine voice and perspectives? What is the feminine voice? And more directly: The struggle is not to integrate women as women, we want to integrate our world view, our political views. And we hope that “our view” sets us apart from men in meaningful ways.

Pragmatic Dilemma

The third dilemma is the pragmatic one. It relates to the fact that Israel is overwhelmingly flooded with alpha-male militaristic discourse. The main political players are almost invariably ex-generals; the main decision-making forums are completely male. In such an environment, a single representative of the female gender wouldn’t really stand a chance. So, do we want to fight for a mere token female representation, and thereby help the male powers that be to pay lip service to the requirement of the law? Or do we, rather, choose to stay outside, thereby perpetuating the present dismal situation?


 
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