Afghanistan

Undefined

From Transition to Transformation - Women, Peace & Security

Afghan Women have had a long journey in terms of their rights and socio-political participation since the Taliban downfall in 2001. As Afghanistan has just entered into a new decade of transformation, the main questions related to women, peace and security remain: What has been built to ensure women’s protection and participation over the last decade? And what strategic approach could consolidate gender equality in the decade to come?

By Abdullah Athayi

“Women are more interested in modern politics”

Humaira Saqib is the chairwoman and editor-in-chief of Women News Agency and Nigah-e Zan magazine. She is also a member of the leadership board of the “Women Political Participation Committee” and a member of “Afghanistan 1400.” In the interview she talks about the political future of women in Afghanistan.

"The government ignores the upcoming generation of females"

Manizha Ramiz heads the women’s committee at the Khatt-e Naw organization. She also teaches at the Accounting and Management Institute and works for Education TV. She was born in Kabul and went to the Ariana High School. She graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in management and is currently doing a Master's degree in psychology at Kabul University.

Policy Paper "Afghan Women Visioning 2024"

The Afghan Women's Network (AWN) has launched the "women visioning 2024" paper. It is a very personal account of achievements women have made over the last decade and they have lined out how the transformation decade beyond 2014 should look like for Afghan women.

Women’s Perceptions of the Afghan National Police

The security needs of Afghan men and women differ. Whereas men bear the brunt of the direct impacts of conflict, women disproportionately suffer from the indirect effects such as increased levels of domestic violence, decreased access to health care and poverty. Due to this difference in security needs, gender must be taken into account when evaluating the relationship between citizens and the Afghan National Police (ANP).

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